How to run Hyper-V on Windows 8 inside VMware Workstation 8

 

Before you read any further, as Dane pointed out, you can install Hyper-V on Microsoft Windows 8 Consumer Preview, but after rebooting you will be presented by a “blue screen”, because a HAL_Memory_Allocation was thrown. This is broken since the beta build. Let’s hope they fix this in the RTM.

 

Meet the power of |”Intel VT-x/EPT”. Normally when you want to install Hyper-V on Windows 8 inside VMware Workstation 8 you will get the following message:

 

Hyper-V cannot be installed: A hypervisor is already running.

 

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Shutdown the machine and edit the Virtual Machine Settings > Hardware > Processors > check the “Virtualize Intel VT-x/EPT”:

 

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One more thing you should do, is edit the vmx file of the Windows 8 VMware virtual machine and add the setting  “hypervisor.cpuid.v0 = “FALSE”, as described here: http://www.veeam.com/blog/nesting-hyper-v-with-vmware-workstation-8-and-esxi-5.html

 

Now you can boot the Windows 8 VMware virtual machine and add install Hyper-V.

Go to Control Panel > Programs and Features > Turn Windows features on or off >

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Now you will get the message: “Provides the services that you can use to create and manage virtual machines and their resources”.

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More information can be found, here: http://virtualizedgeek.com/2011/09/16/nested-win8-hyperv/

Installing Windows 8 on a VMware workstation v8.0.1 virtual machine.

After using VirtualBox and VMWare workstation for running my Windows 8 virtual machines, I seems like VMWare workstation is the winner at this point in time for me.

So here’s the installation guide for creating a Windows 8 VMWare workstation virtual machine.

 

File > New Virtual Machine… >

 

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Remove floppy and printers

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Use the Windows8.iso as DVD:

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Install VMware tools.

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Installing Microsoft Windows 8 on VMWare workstation 8

I was able to successfully install Microsoft Windows 8 as a guest operating system in VMWare Workstation 8 by following the instructions at: http://www.sysprobs.com/guide-install-windows-8-on-vmware-workstation-with-vmware-tools

On previous installations of Windows, I would always format the disk during the installation process. In this case I skipped the formatting and all worked well and I saved some minutes on my installation time, nice!

 

The whole installation process takes less then 10 minutes on a 8 core laptop with 16 GB RAM and SSD.

 

PS I used the [customize option] to use a LIVE id for signing in to Windows 8.

Solving black screen in VMWare 7 full screen or unitiy mode, when using Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 as guest

Only normal en quick switch modus worked for me in VMWare 7, when using Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 as a guest OS.

Enabling 3D acceleration on de virtual machine monitor solved this problem.

Open you’re virtual machine and in the top menu go to:

– VM > Settings > Display > Check [Accelerate 3D graphics]

 

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Mouse pointer disappears, when over textboxes or texteditor in VMWare

When I use a Windows 7 x64 computer and start a Remote Desktop session to a machine running Windows 7 x64 with VMWare 7. De mouse pointer disappears in the VMWare guest running Windows XP, when over textboxes or texteditors.

I found the solution at: http://wiert.wordpress.com/2010/08/06/rdp-to-vmware-host-running-an-xp-guest-invisible-mouse-cursor-on-text-editors/

 

Solution

Change the mouse pointer scheme to "Windows Black (system scheme)"

Start > Control Panel > Mouse > Pointers > Windows Black (system scheme)

Making the switch: VMWare Workstation 7 to Hyper-V server for performance reasons (PowerPivot on SharePoint 2010)

 

History

Back in 2002 I was working with a company which produced a CAD application written in VB6. The product was released in several languages. For each language we had a Microsoft Windows NT 4 workstation with the corresponding language package. I quickly realized that managing these workstations was difficult. So I started to look at virtualization, but it was not until 2003 with new hardware and an other company when I decided to take a look at VMware Workstation version 4.0. This was great I could run all Microsoft Windows languages and different versions on 1 system! Then in 2004 Microsoft released Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 I took a look at the product but soon realized that it could not compete with VMware Workstation and I kept on using VMware Workstation. This worked great for me, except for 2 things:

  1. Performance, if I installed a Windows operating system on a workstation en booted from it, it was much, much faster then when I used a Virtual Machine containing the same windows operation system on that same workstation.
  2. Snapshot – Backup host, if I installed a program or driver on the host and that corrupted the host, there was no out of the box recovery (yes there where al kinds of products that can do that, but not windows out of the box) possibility. One trick I used was to install an windows host OS and then only installed VMware Workstation on it. I would only use the VMware virtual machines and only used the host OS to take snapshots and backups of my virtual machines.

VMware Workstation 7 (paid product)

Part 2 worked fine for me, but then I shifted from being a C# developer to a self-service BI specialist and Microsoft introduced PowerPivot and SharePoint 2010. In late 2009 I started to work with PowerPivot (Gemini at the time) and SharePoint 2010, so I create a VMware 7 development virtual machine with Microsoft Windows 2008 R2, Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2, Microsoft SharePoint 2010 and Microsoft Office 2010 on a 3 year old dell laptop with 4 GB memory. Well that really did not perform at all. I bought a 80 GB Intel Postville G2 M-25 SSD, but the VMware Workstation virtual machine would not perform well and I was waiting on the system all of the time. Then one time I installed Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 as host OS with Microsoft SharePoint 2010 and PowerPivot on it. Well I was really impressed by the speed of the system, I booted in 3 times as fast an all Office products would directly open when I clicked on a document, instead of waiting for the splash screen. I know 4GB of RAM is not enough for a Microsoft SharePoint 2010 PowerPivot development machine, but with the help of the SSD I could manage it. But then I could not take snapshots of my host.

As I said before, VMware Workstation 7 is to slow for me on my hardware for running Microsoft SharePoint 2010 with PowerPivot, that’s why I started to look at hypervisors.

Pros
– Don’t have to no anything about hypervisors, just install windows host OS and then install VMware Workstation 7.0, it’s only a program.
– Supports not only Windows guest operating systems

Cons
– Must be installed on a host operating system (host operating systems consumes cpu, memory and disk space
– Is not free
– “Bad” performance compared to native boot

 

VMware ESXi (freeware)

Then in begin 2010 I learned about hypervisors. VMware has a free product ESXi 4, that can be installed on a system with a (32MB foot print, maximizing the space on the 80GB OS for Virtual Machines) and then you can run different virtual machine containing not only Microsoft OS but also Linux etc without installing a Host OS and having the possibility to take snapshots and backups of the virtual machines . So I created a bootable USB ESXi drive but found out my NIC and SATA controller where not supported, damn! Yes I know, ESXi is not supposed to be installed on a laptop but it would have been nice.

Pros
– Freeware
– No host OS (so not need to snapshot or backup host, only snapshot and backup virtual machines)
– 32 MB footprint
– Supports not only Windows guest operating systems
– Can run Microsoft Windows XP virtual machines
– Can boot from USB without installing

Cons
– Can’t native boot from virtual machines (so a performance impact, but far better then VMware Workstation)
– Could not get it to work with my DELL laptop

 

Microsoft Hyper-V 2008 R2 (freeware)

In 2010 Microsoft released there hypervisor: Microsoft Hyper-V 2008 R2 and it’s free! What did you say, is Microsoft releasing a product that’s free of charge, the answer is; YES. It can be downloaded, here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=48359dd2-1c3d-4506-ae0a-232d0314ccf6&displaylang=en it’s a 1,5 GB ISO. Installed it and after installing I could boot from a VHD file created with Microsoft Windows 2008 R2

Pros
– Freeware
– Native boot from VHD, maximizing performance and hardware possibilities
– No host OS (so not need to snapshot or backup host, only snapshot and backup virtual machines)
– 6GB footprint (after installing)
– Can boot from USB without installing

Cons
– Supports only booting from Microsoft Windows 7 or Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2
– Have to use a “workstation” virtualization product in a booted virtual machine to manage other virtual machines

 

What do I exactly use for developing Microsoft SharePoint 2010 PowerPivot applications

So today what do I exactly use for developing C# vs2008, C# vs2010 and SharePoint 2010 PowerPivot applications

  1. Laptop with Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008 R2 (freeware) installed on a 2,5 inch 80GB SSD boot disk, a 500GB 7200 rpm 2,5 inch for data and virtual machines I don’t often use and 8GB of RAM.
  2. When I start the laptop I boot into a VHD containing Microsoft Windows 2008 R2, Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2, Microsoft SharePoint 2010, Microsoft Office 2010 and the hyper visor role installed to manage other virtual machines. Because I primarily do self service BI work and VS2010 development this is the machine I want the best performance for. I use the hyper-v manager in the this virtual machine to start legacy virtual machines (VS2005 with SQL 2005 or VS2008 with SQL 2008)
  3. In the SharePoint 2010 virtual machine I keep 2 images up date date, a base Microsoft Windows 7 and a base Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 virtual machine. They serve as base for creating new virtual machines, see https://www.roelvanlisdonk.nl/?p=1530. They are updated every week and configured the way I want to, see https://www.roelvanlisdonk.nl/?p=1462
  4. In all I mange 6 virtual machines
    • Microsoft Windows 7 x64 – base for client virtual machines
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 – base for server virtual machines
    • Legacy 2005 development – clone of Microsoft Windows 7 x64 base containing VS2005, Office 2003, SQL Server 2005, SSIS 2005, SSRS 2005, SSAS 2005
    • Legacy 2008 development – clone of Microsoft Windows 7 x64 base containing VS2008, Office 2007, SQL Server 2008, SSIS 2008, SSRS 2008, SSAS 2008
    • SharePoint 2010 development (native boot), clone of Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 x64, containing VS2010, SharePoint 2010 with PowerPivot, Office 2010, SQL Server 2008 R2, SSIS 2008 R2, SSRS 2008 R2, SSAS 2008 R2
    • VPN – clone of Microsoft Windows 7 x64 base containing VPN connections and remote desktop shortcuts to customer machines (I use a virtual machine for this purpose, because, when connected to the VPN I don’t have access to the rest of the network)

 

Conclusion

Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008 R2 rules:

  1. Creating new virtual machines in minutes, containing a fully patched windows host OS and configured the way I like it to be with the ability to boot from the virtual machines, maximizing performance
  2. Can use legacy development machines without rebooting (vs2005, vs2008 for legacy support)
  3. Install a full blown Microsoft SharePoint 2010 development server within 30 minutes on a new laptop or workstation and booting from it, maximizing performance

How to share a printer on Windows 7 with a VMware Workstation 7 image on a NAT Network Connection

If you want to print from a VMware Workstation 7 image, which uses a NAT network connection. You can use the default Windows  printer sharing.
On the host machine: start > devices and printers > add a printer > add a local printer > create a new port > Standard TCP/IP Port >

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Enter the ip adres of the network printer. Click on OK
Right click the created printer > Printer Properties > Sharing > Check “Share this printer”

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On the VMware image:

start > devices and printers > add a printer > add a network printer

It will automatically show the printer, because the host computer and the VMware image share a private network with a NAT network connection

Setting the CPU frequency for better performance in VMWare Workstation

When you have a host system with variable CPU frequency (some powermanagement tools in bios will slow down you’re processor speed to save energy) you must set the right CPU frequency for VMWare quest systems.

See:
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1227
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1754